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Booked using your debit or credit card?

If you booked your travel using an HSBC debit or credit card, here’s what you need to know and how to raise a dispute.

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For debit card and credit card payments

If your travel plans have been disrupted by coronavirus, we may be able to recover some of your money via a ‘chargeback’.

Make sure you refer to your contract and follow the supplier’s refund/re-booking terms in the first instance. You should do this before raising any dispute as this will help your claim.

Claiming a refund from either your travel operator or your card provider may lead to a better outcome for yourself than claiming via your travel insurance, as you may be able to claim the full amount you paid without having to pay an excess. You could also potentially recover losses for all the party members on the booking, some of whom may not have taken insurance. You can find further useful information on this topic on the Money Advice Service website.

For credit card payments

If you paid for your travel with an HSBC credit card and your dispute relates to a purchase of over £100 and under £30,000, you may have protection under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act.

To find out more about Section 75 claims, see these frequently asked questions.

Is there anything I should do before making a claim?

In the first instance, you should contact the travel provider you purchased the goods or services from. For example, the airline you purchased flight tickets from, or the hotel you booked your stay with. If flights, package holidays, or events are cancelled, make sure you refer to your contract and follow the supplier’s refund or re-booking terms. You should try to resolve the matter with the travel provider directly, as they may offer you a refund or an acceptable alternative such as a different booking date or credit vouchers.

You may be able to resolve the matter with your travel provider via a chargeback, or a claim under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act if your dispute refers to a purchase of over £100 and less than £30,000. If you're unable to resolve the matter, HSBC may be able to help you. We’ll need details of your booking, the supplier’s terms and all subsequent correspondence you’ve had with the suppliers to review your claim.

If flights, package holidays, or events are cancelled, make sure you refer to your contract and follow the supplier’s refund/re-booking terms in the first instance. You should do this before raising any dispute with HSBC, as this information may be needed to support any claim.

What if I have future travel plans?

If you have travel arrangements in place but you want to cancel (or have already cancelled), any refunds will be subject to the terms and conditions of the supplier's refund policy.

You may not be entitled to a refund if you have voluntarily opted to cancel. Try contacting the supplier to see if they’re willing to offer a refund or alternative as a gesture of goodwill.

If your date of travel is some time in the future, you may want to wait until nearer the time of travel before making a decision to voluntarily cancel.

You will only be able to raise a dispute or claim under Section 75 if the supplier’s terms and conditions have a refund policy which they decline to honour.

What can I do if I’ve booked my flights and hotel independently (not as a package) and the flights are no longer available?

You should contact the hotel to recover the costs, or arrange a new booking with them. The hotel costs may not be recoverable unless you have cancellation rights in the hotel supplier’s terms. If you’re unable to recover the costs, you may be able to dispute the transaction.

Can I claim a refund for the value of my trip if most of the facilities are closed when I’m there?

This will depend on the travel provider’s terms and the specific circumstances of your case. You may not be entitled to claim a refund if the closures are outside of their control. The travel provider should notify you if they are aware of any closures booked before and during your stay.

What can I do if I’ve booked a holiday to a location where the embassy is no longer issuing visas?

You should avoid additional risk and follow the FCDO and local authority’s advice.

You should contact the airline, travel provider or tour organiser and explain that you’re unable to travel. Depending on the supplier’s terms, you may be able to recover the cost or arrange an alternative trip.

To raise a dispute or claim under Section 75, please provide us with full details of the booking and all correspondence you’ve had with the suppliers and insurers. We’ll then review your case.

Read how to dispute a transaction.

What can I do if the event I booked flights and hotels for is cancelled?

Contact the airline, travel or accommodation provider and check if you’re eligible for a refund due to the event being cancelled. Some companies may offer a refund or allow you to move your booking. Make sure you refer to your contract and follow the supplier’s refund/re-booking terms in the first instance. You should do this before raising any dispute with HSBC as this information may be needed to support any claim.

How to raise a dispute

If you’ve been unable to recover your costs from your travel provider, complete this online dispute form to raise a dispute.

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Useful information

Finding up-to-date information you can rely on can be challenging. We've put together some trusted sources that you may find useful.

GOV.UK

The government's latest support and advice on the coronavirus pandemic.

Foreign & Commonwealth Office

Guidance for British people travelling overseas during the coronavirus pandemic.

UK Civil Aviation Authority

Information about your rights as an airline passenger and what to do if you can't travel.

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